Icy on the Mississippii

 

From the lounge room window I watched the fog roll on to the river and surrounding areas like a grey blanket.  I noticed I brighten up remarkably when the sun peaked through the clouds yesterday and decided to take an early morning walk down to the river and then popped into the local gas station.  They were advertising a new maciano coffee made with fresh milk.  The checkout person always offers a donut with the new coffee and I always decline, muttering that I’ve already had too many donuts over Christmas but appreciated the offer.  The early morning workers rush in to grab a something to drink  or eat and to pay for petrol before they shuffle to wherever they work. Grabbing a cup at the gas station and walking down town and then next to the river is a small routine I have made myself especially during the cold bleak months.Sometimes I  go to the library which is only a block from our place and get my latest fix on Bazar magazine or ‘How to do the best trim board or how to give your remodeled house a curved window look.  I rummage through the dvd isle picking out a hopefully good flick or comedy. Next I might will sit and read  magazines before going home.

All these small routines and habits keep me sane during winter.  I have a couple of groups that I have joined but it is all too easy to slump into a dull half-life when it is cold, sometimes icy days.  It takes a certain dogged mental choice to do the centering in the morning and occasionally if I have an opportunity, I’ll half cheat and sit in bed propped up by pillows.    

I live in the hope that the sun will come back, the ice and snow will melt and I can welcome the warmer weather like a dear cousin I haven’t seen for years.  I might even get emotional when they get here but I say the soon the better.  In the mean time I keep my regular habits, and tick them off for the week.  I do Centering four or more times a week, attending a group centering group, walking daily or at least four or five times a week down town or by the river, the gas station coffee and the library. 

In the mean time, I’ll sit and watch funny movies or comedies and have a good laugh.  Bring on the spring I say.

 

 

 

Are pesky emotions causing you to drop Centering Meditation?

There are times when people and situations can cause us to become agitated or feel strong emotion and these can that get in the way of Centering Meditation.  In my experience, it always pays to deal with the emotion before getting back to Centering, otherwise my focus is scattered and instead of being part of the flow of the universe, Centering Meditation can be the longest, boring, and painful silence.

For example, the other day, I was dealing with a sometimes-difficult tenant and I had to make clear what extra work we would and would not be doing in her apartment.  Her response was one of shock but somehow, I already knew that that was coming.  After the interaction and for some reason I had an old negative feeling of fighting my battles.

For some reason, the interaction with the tenant, my husband standing there but offering no backup or feedback flipped me into a flashback situation of feeling emotionally abandoned, unworthy and fighting my own battles alone.    Needless to say, the communications with husband were frosty for the rest of the day.

According to Wikipedia A flashback, or involuntary recurrent memory, is a psychological phenomenon in which an individual has a sudden, usually powerful, re-experiencing of a past experience or elements of a past experience. These experiences can be happy, sad, exciting, or any other emotion one can consider.[1] The term is used particularly when the memory is recalled involuntarily, and/or when it is so intense that the person “relives” the experience, unable to fully recognize it as memory and not something that is happening in “real time”.[2]

In that situation I used the tapping exercise.   http://www.impactministries.com/bible-based-eft/ There are different techniques that I have used over the years to help bring me back to peace.  Techniques such as tapping or yoga stretches, music.  One could say food is a form of comfort or drugs and alcohol are some other ways people use to quell negative emotions.

Tapping has a Chinese origin and is based on the different meridian points on the body.  Tapping those meridian points while speaking will have an effect of disrupting the negative emotion that is exhibited.    Then on the second time tapping the meridian points –  one speaks some positive truth to replace the emotion.   Finally, the third time, speaking some encouraging truth.  In my case, tapping allowed me to disrupt the negative, replace and reintroduce positive truth which I had momentarily forgotten.

The intention is always to come back to peace and so my time in Centering meditation is not overwhelmed or scattered by the strong emotion.  When stuff happens, as it inevitably will from time to time, consider it a wonderful chance to learn more about yourself, and be happy, thankful and grateful that you can deal with the immediate emotional state through many awesome healing techniques that are available.   Then you can get back to Centering Meditation.

 

 

NEW BLOG! Is your thinking stinking. You might try Centering Meditation

 

My name is Vicky. Welcome to my new blog on Centering Meditation.  My inspiration is to relate this blog to Centering Meditation and veterans and veterans who suffer or who have suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Military Sexual Trauma (MST)and or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) as well as other war related disorders. Any civilians who have been affected by these melodies are encouraged to read along as well.

 

What is Centering Meditation?  It is sitting quietly in silence. If you are new to Centering Meditation, then starting with a few minutes daily and gradually increasing the time to spend in silence. I personally do Centering on a daily basis, yet others might start with once a week, then increase the practice over time.

1675502-woman-meditating-resize

 

A fine visual example of Centering Meditation comes from ‘Open Mind, Open Heart’ by Thomas Keating. Keating says to visualize a wide river.  On the river is an assortment of boats and flotsam of different shapes and sizes.  There are many people sitting and standing, talking and doing various activities on the boats.  The flotsam includes furniture and other objects floating gently down the river. If you can imagine that the objects on the river are the day to day situations, experiences and places in our lives.  The river which is carrying us along is often ignored or only given a casual glance – just enough so we don’t get stuck on a sandbar or hit hidden rocks or debris. Yet the river is a constant immense reality and always the same.  It is always murmuring of her discoveries if only we will listen.  Centering Meditation offers to create an awareness of the interior space beneath the hub bub of what’s happening in life.

How do you do Centering Meditation?

  • Find a quiet place where you won’t be distracted or disturbed.
  • Sit comfortably with eyes shut or if that doesn’t work, focus on an object in the room
  • Have a bell or watch handy so you can keep time.  There are free apps on meditation bells that are easy to download, otherwise a watch or clock will be sufficient.
  • Next chose a sacred word or phrase. There are a number of sources to help select your chosen word or phrase.
  • As the mind wonders and you have other thoughts crowding in, then slowly bring your thoughts back to the sacred word or phrase.

The intention of Centering Meditation is to develop a deep sense of awareness first to our interior silence even if it is only for a number of minutes daily.  The first step to centering is the intention to make the effort.  As a friend mentioned to me the other day as we discussed meditation, she said that her partner David ‘created space’ for meditation.  I was impressed with that saying and liked the idea that we create space in our often busy schedule.  This thought had me thinking that I can create space for centering, as well as the idea to ‘create space’ for other writing projects, my businesses, and attention to my family and friends.  It could even be applied to physical exercise and other areas of life that we choose and are passionate about.  I can go on and on and burrow into the subject but will leave it there for now.  There will be many more thoughts and observations that I want to share as we sojourn along the winding path of centering.

Future posts will cover such questions as:

  • How does Centering heal or enhance the healing of PTSD, MST of TBI
  • Is Centering Meditation faith driven, or solely a process, or both faith and a process?
  • What does it look like?
  • How does it compare to other meditations?

There are a slew of other questions. It’s an exciting journey for me as I’ve practiced Centering for over five years.

I can honestly say that you might not see any outward signs that I have changed so much.  One thing I can say is that I have a rich source of internal life, a peace and strength derived from my times of centering, coupled with my reading of scripture and prayer.  As I have mentioned at a workshop I attended last year, centering becomes a “lifestyle.”  Not that everything is peaches and cream, far from it because normal ups and downs happens in my household as it does in everybody else’s.   But there is a source, ‘the river’ which we give attention to, even if it’s for a short time, that becomes the tangible and constant source.  Is Centering Meditation effective for the traumas of life and war?  A number of studies say yes.  That’s a subject for the future.

 

So welcome to ‘VNRC Centering Meditative’ blog!  Please feel free to comment and join in the conversation.  I do have the right to approve any comments before allowing them to be published so please be respectful and stay on the subject with the spirit of curiosity and openness to learn.  My intention is to have many more people join with me and the community of those who do Centering Meditation.

Businesswoman meditating with eyes closed

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VNRC Proposes plan to help keep Hot Springs VA open

KBHB, August 12, HOT SPRINGS, S.D. – The Veteran’s National Recovery Center is proposing to build several specialty centers at the Hot Springs VA – a proposal they’re calling a ‘medical miracle,’ because they hope it may keep the historic hospital from closing.

Veterans’ National Recovery Center president Bob Krause says it’s an optimistic new proposal, aimed at saving the Hot Springs VA from closure. For the past two years, Krause says the organization has been drafting a plan to create a medical research institute and college on the campus of the Hot Springs VA Medical Center.

Krause says the proposal will be presented as part of the overall environmental impact statement process being undertaken by the Department of Veterans Affairs to determine the future of the Hot Springs VA Medical Center. It would create a new osteopathic college on the Hot Springs VA campus.

The college would leverage its research on regenerative medicine for burns into a long-term investment to fund the continued operation of the facility.

Meanwhile, members of the ‘Save the VA Committee’ say their concerns about the proposal center around what’s called an ‘Enhanced Use Lease.” An EUL is essentially a program that uses to rent out unused facilities to non-VA programs. Save the VA Committee member Bob Nelson.

“That really opens the door for the VA to say ‘there’s someone out there that wants these buildings. We can vacate them and move forward with our proposal.’ That concerns us. Those buildings should be up there for veterans. Mr. Krouse’s proposal, if he’s able to pull it off, certainly would enhance that.”

The VNRC says its proposal would only work if the Department of Veterans Affairs decides not to follow through with closing certain elements of the Hot Springs facility.

A Congressional field hearing to discuss the future of the Hot Springs VA is scheduled for 10 a.m. on Thursday at the Hot Springs Mueller Center.

New idea for VA facility has educational focus

HOT SPRINGS, S.D. (AP) – A proposal to save the historic Veterans Affairs hospital in Hot Springs includes adding a medical college, and medical research and treatment using stem cells. The three-pronged approach is being broached by the Veterans National Recovery Center of Des Moines, Iowa. Officials will submit the plan to Veterans Affairs as the… Continue reading New idea for VA facility has educational focus

Iowa group submits EIS proposal

August 11, 2014 10:32 am  • 

VNRC suggests alternatives

HOT SPRINGS – A Des Moines, Iowa-based group, the Veterans National Recovery Center (VNRC) released its proposal for the Hot Springs campus of the VA Black Hills Health Care System, at a special event held Aug. 11 at Centennial Park.

Bob Krause, the president of the VNRC, presented a “Proposal for the Southwest South Dakota Medical Miracle, on behalf of the company. A copy of the proposal was released to the Hot Springs Star prior to the meeting and information was taken from the proposal for this story.

According to the written proposal, which is available in its entirety at www.hotspringsstar.com, the “Medical Miracle” will provide national benefits to the Dept. of Veterans Affairs, through its training, as well as its innovative health services.

“It (the VNRC proposal) aids local veterans by keeping the facility in place and it provides an economic development future for one of the most depressed poverty pockets in the nation,” the proposal says.

One part of the Medical Miracle is an osteopathic college that provides interns and growth opportunities for VA doctors.

According to the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine’s web site, osteopathic medicine provides the benefits of modern medicine while offering hands-on diagnosis and treatment through a therapy system known as osteopathic manipulative medicine, achieving wellness by focusing on health promotion and disease prevention in a hands-on, holistic manner.

A research institute is also part of the VNRC proposal, with regenerative and convalescent medicines being the two disciplinary anchors for research and training at the research institute and the college.

According to the proposal, regenerative medicine can be a unique tool for veterans and soldiers that have been injured in bomb blasts, fires and by small arms. It can also be used as a geriatric tool to solve problems with bed sores and failing organs. It capitalizes on the unique healing springs that are present in Hot Springs and have been used by the VA and others for convalescence in the past.

The elements of the proposal are the Battle Mountain College, Battle Mountain Clinic, the Battle Mountain Research Institute, Elanix – a private sector regenerative medicine firm, the Veterans National Recovery Center Foundation and Battle Mountain Veterans Affairs Hospital.

Public sector cost for set up is $8 million in the first year, with a cumulative investment of $50 million spread over five years. In addition to being president of VNRC, Krause is also a consultant for Elanix.

The Veterans National Recovery Center is a 501(c)(3) charitable corporation established in 2010 to bring awareness to the massive influx of PTSD-afflicted veterans back into America from battles abroad following 9-11.

VNRC began to work in the field of skin regeneration in 2012. The group became aware of the many injuries caused by Improvised Explosive Devices (IED’s) during the war. A significant number of these were burn injuries, and it seemed to be a niche where little innovative was being done. As part of this process, VNRC worked jointly with the Swiss Consortium Partnership to develop a grant proposal, which was tied to Hot Springs, because of the technology’s requirement for extensive hydrotherapy after surgery in order to promote the skin regeneration.

In that grant application, a remodeled Castle Manor Nursing Home was to become a skin regeneration clinic and research facility. Although the grant application failed, VNRC developed knowledge from the exercise and continued to pursue its vision.

Hot Springs Star

New proposal hopes to save Hot Springs VA by adding research institute

By: Brendyn Medina, KEVN

A new proposal is being billed as a ‘medical miracle’ that will keep the Hot Springs VA and its medical services in the Southern Hills. That proposal was unveiled on Monday.

Veterans’ National Recovery Center president Bob Krause says, “Congress just authorized 18 new specialty centers for the VA. We want to grab one for Hot Springs.”

It’s an optimistic new proposal, aimed at saving the Hot Springs VA from closure. For the past two years, the organization known as the Veterans’ National Recovery Center has been drafting a plan to create a medical research institute and college on the campus of the Hot Springs VA Medical Center.

Krause says, “It addresses the issues of doctor shortages and doctor problems. It addresses the issues of populations of patients, and it helps to underwrite the cost of VA services here.”

The VNRC says its proposal will be presented as part of the overall environmental impact statement process being undertaken by the Department of Veterans Affairs to determine the future of the Hot Springs VA Medical Center. It would create a new osteopathic college on the Hot Springs VA campus.

Osteopathic Physician Don Swift II says, “We really have an eye to the body’s ability to heal itself. We tend to be a bit more holistic or conservative, from what I’ve seen. We may have a little bit different of an approach, but the end is the same. We want to heal someone.”

The college would leverage its research on regenerative medicine for burns into a long-term investment to fund the continued operation of the facility.

Krause says, “We will put that money into a non-profit foundation. We will dedicate that fund as it grows to the college, to the research institute, to the clinic, and to the V.A. Hospital itself.”

Meanwhile, members of the ‘Save the VA Committee’ say their concerns about the proposal center around what’s called an ‘Enhanced Use Lease.’ An EUL is essentially a program that the VA uses to rent out unused facilities to non-VA programs.

‘Save the VA Committee’ member Bob Nelson says, “That really opens the door for the VA to say ‘there’s someone out there that wants these buildings. We can vacate them and move forward with our proposal.’ That concerns us. Those buildings should be up there for veterans. Mr. Krouse’s proposal, if he’s able to pull it off, certainly would enhance that.”

The VNRC says its proposal would only work if the Department of Veterans Affairs decides *not* to follow through with closing certain elements of the Hot Springs facility.

A Congressional field hearing to discuss the future of the Hot Springs VA is scheduled for 10 a.m. on Thursday at the Hot Springs Mueller Center.

Vets group to announce alternative to closing Hot Springs VA

HOT SPRINGS (AP) — A group trying to keep the historic VA hospital in Hot Springs from closing says it has developed an alternative plan.

Veterans National Recovery Center of Des Moines, Iowa, is to release its proposal Monday at a news conference in the Black Hills town.

Group president Bob Krause says it’s the most viable alternative to be considered in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Environmental Impact Statement process.

The Daily Republic

Redefining care

By MIKE MALLOY – Staff Writer
(mmalloy@timesrepublican.com)
, Times-Republican
October 23, 2011

Tightening of standards at the Iowa Veterans Home led to the discharge of many veterans

The Iowa Veterans Home discharged a few dozen residents over the past two years who didn’t want to leave the facility. Emails obtained through an open records request by the Times-Republican and numerous interviews reveal that some of those released eventually became homeless, while others relapsed into alcohol and drug use.

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